Google is just looking out for the folks

I noticed this little nugget in the Google Analytics FAQ :

Due to user privacy concerns, Google Analytics doesn’t report on personally identifiable information, including a visitor’s IP address.

Is this the same Google that will take a picture of you in your own home from 20 feet away, post it online, and tell you if you don’t want to be photographed in a certain manner you shouldn’t be doing it visibly in “public” ? This is in spite of the fact that I already have access to the IP addresses that visit the site.

Of course the real kicker is that they say they don’t report on such information, it doesn’t say they don’t capture it and use it for their own nefarious ends.

JBoss Java EE 6 spec dependency in Maven

Adam Bien wrote about the Troubled with the crippled Java EE 6 APIs in Maven and a solution for them. Another solution has presented itself now that JBoss has finalized the Java EE 6 spec pom and added it to their public repositories as of early January 2011.

You can include the spec in your own project by adding the following to your pom.xml :

<dependency>
	<groupId>org.jboss.spec</groupId>
	<artifactId>jboss-javaee-6.0</artifactId>
	<version>1.0.0.Final</version>
	<type>pom</type>
</dependency>

You may also need to add the JBoss repository to your pom.xml which is defined as :

<repositories>
	<repository>
		<id>repository.jboss.org</id>
		<name>JBoss Repository</name>
		<url>http://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/groups/public-jboss/</url>
	</repository>
</repositories>

I’ll be adding this pom to the Knappsack archetypes to resolve some of the issues people have been facing with the broken spec dependency.

Delphi still fighting the war lost years ago

Embarcadero announced the release of the Delphi XE Starter edition for building native windows applications. I spent many years as a Delphi developer before I made the switch to Java while the Delphi programming language and tools were top notch at the time. However, with the years of abuse at the hands of Borland and then Codegear, it fell way behind. Java IDEs in general are far superior with a lot of attention paid to the actual code aspects of the IDEs while Delphi was very GUI centric and provided superior visual editors. Of course, Delphi is very rigid in how you build applications while Java provides a lot more flexibility to the point of having too much flexibility (the story of Java’s life).
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A Little Less Conversation…

One thing that I wrote that I haven’t really gotten around to examining and verifying in closer detail and validating my position on is the production of the conversational entity manager in the Knappsack archetypes. This article looks at this and re-evaluates my thinking on the use of conversational contexts in CDI.
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Read All About It!

I dusted off my PHP skills and added a new custom wordpress page to list all articles for a set of tags to create a kind of index page. The articles are grouped by tag and ordered by date so you can see the whole library of articles and tutorials. You can also find the index linkin the list of links in the header.

Can Arquillian boost Java EE container quality?

Arquillian, JBoss’ foray into providing in-container testing for Java EE projects, could be used to give Java EE container developers the ability to test their containers using a set of tests based on expected Java EE behavior. Such tests will enable developers of the next generation of application servers to not only run unit and integration tests on their contains but can be used to ensure compliance with the Java EE spec. It would be especially useful for integration testing where different frameworks are developed in isolation leading to integration issues when it gets out to the public.

In an ideal world, the Java EE vendors could get together and share a common open set of tests to ensure that they are all following the same rules of the spec, almost like an informal TCK. Having such a set of tests would ensure higher quality application servers are turned out in a faster time. Going from Java EE 5 to Java EE 6 was quite a big leap, I don’t think anyone is expecting as much of a leap from Java EE 6 to 7 or 8, so now would be a good time to consider those options.

This is one of those things where everybody gains. All the vendors get the benefits of product improvement due to the unit tests and they all get the benefits of Java EE having a better reputation as a solid, portable framework with more timely releases.