Java


JBoss Java EE 6 spec dependency in Maven

Adam Bien wrote about the Troubled with the crippled Java EE 6 APIs in Maven and a solution for them. Another solution has presented itself now that JBoss has finalized the Java EE 6 spec pom and added it to their public repositories as of early January 2011.

You can include the spec in your own project by adding the following to your pom.xml :

<dependency>
	<groupId>org.jboss.spec</groupId>
	<artifactId>jboss-javaee-6.0</artifactId>
	<version>1.0.0.Final</version>
	<type>pom</type>
</dependency>

You may also need to add the JBoss repository to your pom.xml which is defined as :

<repositories>
	<repository>
		<id>repository.jboss.org</id>
		<name>JBoss Repository</name>
		<url>http://repository.jboss.org/nexus/content/groups/public-jboss/</url>
	</repository>
</repositories>

I’ll be adding this pom to the Knappsack archetypes to resolve some of the issues people have been facing with the broken spec dependency.

A Little Less Conversation…

One thing that I wrote that I haven’t really gotten around to examining and verifying in closer detail and validating my position on is the production of the conversational entity manager in the Knappsack archetypes. This article looks at this and re-evaluates my thinking on the use of conversational contexts in CDI.
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Can Arquillian boost Java EE container quality?

Arquillian, JBoss’ foray into providing in-container testing for Java EE projects, could be used to give Java EE container developers the ability to test their containers using a set of tests based on expected Java EE behavior. Such tests will enable developers of the next generation of application servers to not only run unit and integration tests on their contains but can be used to ensure compliance with the Java EE spec. It would be especially useful for integration testing where different frameworks are developed in isolation leading to integration issues when it gets out to the public.

In an ideal world, the Java EE vendors could get together and share a common open set of tests to ensure that they are all following the same rules of the spec, almost like an informal TCK. Having such a set of tests would ensure higher quality application servers are turned out in a faster time. Going from Java EE 5 to Java EE 6 was quite a big leap, I don’t think anyone is expecting as much of a leap from Java EE 6 to 7 or 8, so now would be a good time to consider those options.

This is one of those things where everybody gains. All the vendors get the benefits of product improvement due to the unit tests and they all get the benefits of Java EE having a better reputation as a solid, portable framework with more timely releases.

JBoss 6.0 CR1 is Released

JBoss has put out a CR1 release for JBoss 6.0 which implements the Java EE 6 specification. I don’t normally cover product releases, but I thought I may as well mention it since nobody else has (not even their blog). I only found out when I was sniffing around in their Maven Repositories and found the CR1 version of things. You download the latest from the JBoss download site.

Considering Thick Client Javascript Applications

A post on Javalobby (Are Serverside Web Frameworks Becoming Irrelevant?) got me thinking again about javascript based web apps also called SOFEA or SOUI applications. While I don’t believe that the end is near for server side frameworks, (after all a similar post was written 3 years ago), I think it there is a growing interest in these development models.

Now and again I take a look at javascript based client side web development interacting with web services since the notion of a thick, rich client using distributed stateless reusable web services that can just be deployed off into the cloud can be very alluring.
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