CDI


Java EE 6 Is Here

Like Christmas come early, Sun announced the release of JEE 6. This release sees continued improvement in the JEE stack with the inclusion of JSR 299, Java Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI), and EJB 3.1 as well as JSF 2.0, and JPA 2.0. JSF especially has seen changes as a result of practical user feedback and community add-ons such as Seam and JSF Ajax frameworks which have contributed back to the JCP.

Glassfish v3 which implements the full JEE 6 stack has also been released, with JBoss’ Weld as the CDI implementation. Netbeans 6.8 has also been released with full JEE 6 project support including maven support for enterprise applications. Also of note is the hot deploy function of Glassfish which can deploy your app while maintaining session information.

Personally, I’m pleased. JEE 6 has really improved things for the java standards, and CDI has filled some gaps that previously required different additional pieces to completely fill. The ghosts of EJB 2.1 should now be permanently laid to rest, but should serve as a stark reminder. Having good frameworks to build standards based solutions is always good for the community.

I’ll try and get some tutorials on developing with CDI and JSF 2.0 with Netbeans and Glassfish out soon.

Seam is Dead, Long live Seam

With Weld 1.0, the reference implementation of JSR 299 – Java Contexts and Dependency Injection now released, attention at JBoss has no doubt turned to Seam 3 which is going to be built on top of Weld. Red Hat and JBoss are committed to returning innovations back the JCP as is the case with Seam which not only resulted in JSR 299, but has also influenced a number of other JSRs especially JSF 2. With JSR 299 standardizing the Seam ‘style’ of development it also brings about a some fundamental game changes for Seam 3 (hence the title) as much of the strength of Seam becomes part of the JEE standards.
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Conversational Pitfalls

Seam conversations have certain rules that you need to be aware of when using them. This article came about because for the last couple of years, the same questions have been asked on the Seam forums regarding conversations. It is also a couple of issues that cropped up while I was working on the Seam vs. Spring Web Flow articles. Some of the problems are uncannily similar with similar solutions, so parts of this series may be of interest to non-Seam users. Additionally, it seems like a lot of this stuff will also apply to the conversational pieces of JSR 299 – Contexts and Dependency Injection which will be a part of JEE 6.
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