Articles


Can Arquillian boost Java EE container quality?

Arquillian, JBoss’ foray into providing in-container testing for Java EE projects, could be used to give Java EE container developers the ability to test their containers using a set of tests based on expected Java EE behavior. Such tests will enable developers of the next generation of application servers to not only run unit and integration tests on their contains but can be used to ensure compliance with the Java EE spec. It would be especially useful for integration testing where different frameworks are developed in isolation leading to integration issues when it gets out to the public.

In an ideal world, the Java EE vendors could get together and share a common open set of tests to ensure that they are all following the same rules of the spec, almost like an informal TCK. Having such a set of tests would ensure higher quality application servers are turned out in a faster time. Going from Java EE 5 to Java EE 6 was quite a big leap, I don’t think anyone is expecting as much of a leap from Java EE 6 to 7 or 8, so now would be a good time to consider those options.

This is one of those things where everybody gains. All the vendors get the benefits of product improvement due to the unit tests and they all get the benefits of Java EE having a better reputation as a solid, portable framework with more timely releases.

Resource Bundles in JSF 2.0 Applications

Setting up resource message bundles in JSF to provide multilingal messages and captions is often overlooked when first creating an application. Leaving it till later in the project means you will have to go back and manually change the constants over to resource based values. Resource bundles JSF 1.2 were far from perfect but fortunately, using resource bundles in JSF 2.0 is very easy and this tutorial will show you how to add bundles and use them in your JSF 2.0 pages.
Read More »

Considering Thick Client Javascript Applications

A post on Javalobby (Are Serverside Web Frameworks Becoming Irrelevant?) got me thinking again about javascript based web apps also called SOFEA or SOUI applications. While I don’t believe that the end is near for server side frameworks, (after all a similar post was written 3 years ago), I think it there is a growing interest in these development models.

Now and again I take a look at javascript based client side web development interacting with web services since the notion of a thick, rich client using distributed stateless reusable web services that can just be deployed off into the cloud can be very alluring.
Read More »

Context matters when discussing frameworks

As if web framework religious discussions weren’t annoying enough, one thing that I always think is missing from such debates is context regarding the type of application being developed. It’s like discussing the best mode of personal travel without taking the type and size of journey into account. There’s a reason why you walk to the mailbox and drive to the store. You can drive to the mailbox but it will incur costs greater than the benefits. Similarly, you can walk to the store as long as it isn’t too far, you have the time to do so and you aren’t buying much.
Read More »

CDI Conversations Part 1

This is the first in a series of articles looking at the conversation scope introduced in CDI as part of Java EE 6. We’ll start by looking at existing scopes and how they introduce limitations for developers and how CDI conversations get around these limitations.
Read More »